WDC welcomes Bill Gates’ investment in dementia

BILL GATES JOINS BATTLE AGAINST DEMENTIA

World Dementia Council welcomes boost for research on disease-modifying therapies

 

Respected philanthropist Bill Gates has invested $50 million in the Dementia Discovery Fund (DDF). This is Mr Gates’ first investment in dementia research, and a personal one, sparked by experience of Alzheimer’s in his family, which, in turn, spurred him to spend time learning about the disease. Alzheimer’s is the most common of the diseases causing the symptoms of dementia.

 

Through this investment, Mr Gates recognizes that dementia is one of the most urgent health and economic challenges facing the world today. It has enormous human and financial impacts. Despite this, we currently lack drugs to prevent or cure the condition. With increasing prevalence rates globally, the need for effective disease-modifying therapies is pressing.

 

The G7 Dementia Summit in London in December 2013 set ambitions to identify a cure or disease-modifying therapy for dementia by 2025 and seek innovative ways to significantly increase investment in dementia research. The World Dementia Council, established after the Summit to lead global action towards the ambitions, endorsed the creation of an innovative public-private equity fund to accelerate progress to these ends.

 

Launched in 2015, the DDF invests in pioneering research and companies to speed up the discovery and development of disease-modifying therapies. It is the world’s first-ever dementia-focussed venture capital fund.

 

Dr Yves Joanette and Raj Long, respectively Chair and Vice-Chair of the World Dementia Council, welcomed the announcement. Dr Joanette said, “We are delighted that Bill Gates is joining the global race to defeat dementia and applaud his foresight. His very significant investment is timely as we are up against the worldwide clock to slow-down or halt the diseases that cause dementia. Bill Gates’ involvement is a major boost in enabling further and faster progress in breakthroughs on which effective new treatments will depend. Such treatments are a crucial component of the wider global agenda on prevention and cure, and improved care for people living with dementia.”